Seafloor Rises and Sinks Because of Melting Glaciers and Ice Caps (Study)

Melting ice causing the seafloor to rise

It’s no secret that president of the United States Donald Trump doesn’t believe in climate change and thinks that it’s something manufactured. However, this doesn’t make it any less real. He numerous times said that climate change is the same thing as the weather, which couldn’t be more wrong. Actually, climate change is the only thing that can make the seafloor subside or rise and this phenomenon, according to experts, is happening right now.

These warm temperatures cause the glaciers and the ice caps to melt. The meltwater then flows into seas and oceans and the larger volume of water pushes down the seafloor. This phenomenon is also a different way of looking at the term “rising sea levels”. A new study, which the journal Geophysical Research Letters published, found an 8% difference between measures of sea level obtained by satellites and those taken by tide gauges. This means that satellite measurements are not as correct as we thought.

Changes in the seafloor

According to Thomas Frederikse, the leader of this study, this chance varies depending on the area. Mainly because the Northern Hemisphere loses more ice than the Southern one, for example. This also means that the Arctic Ocean increased with 1 millimeter more each year than satellite data initially showed. In comparison, the South Pacific increased by 60% less. The authors are also saying that in the future, when ice sheets will increase sea level rise even more, this difference between measurements will most probably also increase.

It’s important to note that even if in some places the bottom is sinking, in others it is rising. For example, some of these areas are where glaciers are melting, therefore reducing the weight. And because a lot of ice is melting in the Northern Hemisphere, that is also the place where seafloor is rising. The authors are noting that people should know that climate change doesn’t only change the temperatures, but also the planet.

Image source: nasa.gov


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